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Archive for November 16th, 2020|Daily archive page

A TYRANT NOBODY NOW FEARS

In Bureaucracy, History, Politics, Social commentary on November 16, 2020 at 12:06 am

Donald Trump now occupies that most dangerous—and despised—of positions: He’s a tyrant that nobody no longer fears.

His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said at a press conference shortly after Joe Biden was projected to become the 46th President of the United States that Trump would not concede the election. 

His sons, Donald Junior and Eric, continue to urge him to challenge the results in court—an action he vowed to take on the night of November 4, when it was clear he was losing in the Electoral College.

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Donald Trump

But the Republican party is gradually—and silently—moving away from him.

According to a November 7 article in The New Republic: “Donald Trump Lost the Election. He’s Losing His Party, Too.” Writes Osita Nwanevu:

“In the past few days, condemnations of Trump’s claims about voter fraud or defenses of the electoral process have come not only from Trump critics like Senators Ben Sasse, Susan Collins, and Mitt Romney, but figures who’ve generally been more defensive of the president like former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, as well as swing state governors Doug Ducey of Arizona and  Mike Dewine of Ohio.

“Senator Mitch McConnell, who’s on the cusp of returning to the chamber as majority leader in January, has also pushed back. ‘Claiming you’ve won the election,’ he told reporters on Wednesday, ‘is different from finishing the counting.'”   

And even Fox News—a longtime and vocal Trump supporter—aroused the ire of Trump supporters by announcing, on November 7, a Joe Biden victory in the Presidential race.

Seventy-five years ago, Germans who had spent 12 years fawning over their Fuhrer, Adolf Hitler, made a similar about-face when it was clear he had led them to disaster. 

Adolf Hitler

On April 23, 1945, in his secure Berlin Bunker, Hitler received a telegram from Reichsmarshall Herman Goring. 

Hitler had formally named Goring his successor. If he died, or lost his freedom of action through incapacity, disappearance or abduction, Goring would have full power to act on Hitler’s behalf.

With Hitler refusing to leave Berlin in the face of a massive Russian advance, Goring asked: Should I assume the leadership of Germany? He added that if Hitler did not reply by 10 p.m. that night, he would assume Hitler had lost his freedom of action and so would assume leadership of the Reich.

On April 25, facing a rapidly-disintegrating military situation, Hitler sent Goring a telegram accusing him of “high treason” and giving him an ultimatum: Resign all of his offices (such as commander of the Luftwaffe) “for reasons of health” or forfeit his life.

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Hermann Goring

The Reichsmarshall quickly resigned. 

(After surrendering to American forces, Goring was tried and convicted as a war criminal at Nuremberg, he committed suicide by poison pill just before his scheduled hanging.)

On April 28, Hitler received an even greater shock: He discovered through an Allied radio broadcast that Heinrich Himmler—Reichsfuhrer-SS of the dreaded, black-uniformed secret police—had been secretly negotiating surrender terms with the Western Allies.

Hitler raged against Himmler—whom he had called “the true Heinrich.” But Himmler was safely outside Berlin and beyond his reach. So Hitler did the next best thing and ordered the arrest and execution of Hermann Fegelein, Himmler’s SS liaison in the bunker. 

Fegelein—who was married to the sister of Eva Braun—Hitler’s mistress—was immediately shot. 

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Heinrich Himmler

(Himmler, taken prisoner by British troops—committed suicide with a cyanide pill.)

On April 30, Hitler and Eva—his newly-married wife of one day—committed suicide.

On May 8, 1945, Nazi Germany officially surrendered to the Allies.

German historian Joachim C. Fest, author of the bestselling 1973 biography Hitler, noted the surprise awaiting Allied soldiers occupying Nazi Germany: “Almost without exception, virtually from one moment to the next, Nazism vanished after the death of Hitler and the surrender….

“Hitler’s propaganda specialists had talked constantly of invincible alpine redoubts, nests of resistance, and swelling werewolf units….but there was no sign of this.

“It was as if National Socialism had been nothing but the motion, the state of intoxication and the catastrophe it had caused….Once again it became plain that National Socialism, like Fascism in general, was dependent to the core on superior force, arrogance, triumph, and by its nature had no resources in the moment of defeat.”

Donald Trump’s four-year reign had been based entirely on “superior force, arrogance and triumph.” At times he seemed to be daring his enemies to do their worst.

He had:

  • Fired an FBI director for daring to investigate his collusion with Russian Intelligence agents;
  • Shut down the government to extort money from Congress for an ineffective border wall; and
  • Tried to extort the president of Ukraine to frame his potential rival—former Vice President Joe Biden—in the upcoming 2020 election.

Throughout these cases, Republicans had backed him 100%—out of conviction or fear of losing their Congressional seats to his enraged base.

But now almost 75 million Americans had chosen Biden over him. And while Trump claimed himself the victim of massive election fraud, he offered no evidence to prove it.

He has become that most despised of men: A tyrant that nobody fears.

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