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Archive for September 6th, 2022|Daily archive page

“OUR CASINOS ARE MORAL–THEIRS ARE IMMORAL”: PART ONE (OF TWO)

In Bureaucracy, Business, History, Law, Law Enforcement, Politics, Social commentary on September 6, 2022 at 12:10 am

According to the August 24 edition of the Orange County Register, Californians are most concerned about these issues:

Their No. 1 concern remains COVID-19. 

After that come

  • Homelessness
  • Rising prices
  • Crime

But the average Californian wouldn’t know that from watching the flood of “dueling casino” ads on TV and the Internet. 

Yes, it’s Proposition 26 versus Proposition 27, each one claiming a non-existent righteousness on behalf of different Indian tribes.

From these, Californians get the overwhelming message that the most important issue for their state is: “Our casinos are moral; theirs are not.” 

According to the website of the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, a nonpartisan fiscal and policy advisor:

California Legislative Analyst's Office (logo).jpg

California Legislative Analyst’s Office

“The California Constitution and state law limit gambling in California. For example, state law bans sports betting, roulette, and games with dice (such as craps). However, it allows some gambling.

“This includes: 

  • State Lottery: About 23,000 stores in all 58 counties sell lottery games. Lottery sales—after prizes and operation costs—support education. About $1.9 billion in lottery revenue supported education last year.
  • Cardrooms: Currently, 84 cardrooms in 32 counties can offer certain card games (such as poker). Cardrooms pay state and local feels and taxes. For example, cardrooms pay the state around $24 million each year (annually) generally for regulatory costs. Cardrooms also pay around $100 million each year to the cities they are located in.
  • Horse Racing Betting: Four privately operated racetracks as well as 29 fairs, publicly operated racetracks, and other facilities in 17 counties offer betting on horse racing. The horse racing industry pays state and local fees and taxes. Last year, the industry paid the state around $18 million in fees primarily for state regulatory costs. 
  • Tribal Casinos:  Tribes operate 66 casinos in 28 counties under specific agreements between certain tribes and the state. These casinos offer slot machines, lottery games, and card games on tribal lands. Last year, tribes paid around $65 million to support state regulation and gambling addiction programs. Tribes also pay tens of millions of dollars to local governments each year. Additionally, tribes operating larger casinos pay nearly $150 million each year to tribes that either do not operate casinos or have less than 350 slot machines.”

Then the analyst’s office defines Proposition 26:

“Proposition 26 allows in-person sports betting at racetracks and tribal casinos. It requires that racetracks and casinos that offer sports betting make certain payments to the state—such as to support state regulatory costs. The proposition also allows additional gambling—such as roulette—at tribal casinos. Finally, it adds a new way to enforce certain state gambling laws.

Proposition 26 changes the California Constitution and state law to allow the state’s privately operated racetracks and tribal casinos to offer sports betting. However, the proposition bans bets on certain sports—such as high school games and games in which California college teams participate.”

The analyst’s office then states what a Yes or No vote on Proposition 26 would mean: 

“A YES vote on this measure means: Four racetracks could offer in-person sports betting. Racetracks would pay the state a share of sports bets made. Tribal casinos could offer in-person sports betting, roulette, and games played with dice (such as craps) if permitted by individual tribal gambling agreements with the state. Tribes would be required to support state sports betting regulatory costs at casinos. People and entities would have a new way to seek enforcement of certain state gambling laws.”

“A NO vote on this measure means: Sports betting would continue to be illegal in California. Tribal casinos would continue to be unable to offer roulette and games played with dice. No changes would be made to the way state gambling laws are enforced.”

(Color print is not included in the website.) 

California's Prop 26 Sports Betting Ballot Initiative Explained | Vote YES on 26

Opposing Proposition 26 are the backers of Proposition 27. 

More than a century ago, opposing Indian tribes fought with knives, tomahawks and arrows. The reason: To acquire the better hunting grounds of neighboring tribes.

Today they wield multi-million-dollar advertising spots on television. And the reason: To gain more customers for their casinos while siphoning off customers from their rivals.

As a result, California’s TVs and computers are now clogged round-the-clock with dueling gambling propositions.

And directly competing with Proposition 26 for votes is Proposition 27.

According to the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, Proposition 27 will allow “online and mobile sports wagering outside tribal lands.

“In California, compacts allow tribal casinos to offer slot machines and other games on tribal lands. These compacts lay out how gambling will be regulated. They also require certain payments, such as to the state and local governments. Tribes can ask for these compacts to be changed, such as when new types of gambling become legal in the state.

“California currently has compacts with 79 tribes. Tribes currently operate 66 casinos in 28 counties. Last year [2021], tribes paid around $65 million to support state regulatory and gambling addiction program costs. Tribes also pay tens of millions of dollars to local governments each year (annually). Additionally, tribes operating larger casinos pay nearly $150 million each year to tribes that either do not operate casinos or have less than 350 slot machines.”

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