bureaucracybusters

“HIGH NOON” FOR TRUMP-FEARING REPUBLICANS

In Bureaucracy, Entertainment, History, Law Enforcement, Politics, Social commentary on August 31, 2017 at 12:10 am
I do not know what fate awaits me
I only know I must be brave.
And I must face the man who hates me
Or lie a coward, a craven coward, 
Or lie a coward in my grave.
–Theme song from “High Noon”

 

A Pew Research Center survey released on August 29 found that 36% of Americans approve of President Donald Trump. Most other polling rates his approval between 35 and 40%.

Other findings of the survey included:

  • Just over two-thirds of Republicans agree with his positions;
  • Among Democrats, 94% disagree with them;
  • 15% of respondents agreed with Trump on all or nearly all issues;
  • 18% agreed with him on many issues;
  • 21% agreed on a few issues; and
  • 45% didn’t agree with him on issues at all.

Asked what they thought of Trump’s conduct in office, Republicans were divided:

  • 19% didn’t like his conduct;
  • 46% said they had mixed feelings;
  • 34% liked the way he behaved as President.

When asked what they liked most about Trump’s Presidency, those who approved of his performance cited his personality and conduct four times more often than his policies.

Donald Trump

On August 30, an article in Salon tackled this group head-on: “Most Americans Strongly Dislike Trump, But the Angry Minority That Adores Him Controls Our Politics.”

It described these voters as representing about one-third of the Republican party:

“These are older and more conservative white people, for the most part, who believe he should not listen to other Republicans and should follow his own instincts….

“They like Trump’s coarse personality, and approve of the fact that he treats women like his personal playthings. They enjoy it when he expresses sympathy for neo-Nazis and neo-Confederate white supremacists.

“They cheer when he declares his love for torture, tells the police to rough up suspects and vows to mandate the death penalty for certain crimes. (Which of course the president cannot do.)

“…This cohort of the Republican party didn’t vote for Trump because of his supposed policies on trade or his threat to withdraw from NATO. They voted for him because he said out loud what they were thinking. A petty, sophomoric, crude bully is apparently what they want as a leader.”

According to the Pew survey, they only comprise 16% percent of the population. That leaves 65% of Republicans who are revolted by Trump’s personality and behavior.

But they are being advised by GOP political consultants to vigorously support him.

“Your heart tells you that he’s bad for the country,” one anonymous consultant told the Salon reporter. “Your head looks at polling data among Republican primary voters and sees how popular he is.” 

It’s precisely these hard-core Fascists who come out in mid-term elections—and they’re scaring the remaining 65% who make up the GOP establishment.

Their highest priority, after all, is to hold onto their privileged positions in the House and Senate.  And anything that might jeopardize that—including what’s best for the country—can go hang.

Perhaps it’s time for Republicans to remember the lesson taught by High Noon, the classic 1952 Western starring Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly.  

High Noon poster.jpg

Town marshal Will Kane (Cooper) has just marred Amy Fowler (Kelly) a Quaker. It should be the happiest day of his life. But shortly after the ceremony, word comes that Frank Miller—a notorious murderer Kane once sent to prison—has been released.

Even worse, Miller and three other killers are coming into town on the noon train—to kill Kane.

Kane’s first instinct is to flee: He and his wife get into a buggy and dash out of town. But then his sense of duty takes over. He returns to town, intending to recruit a posse.

But this proves impossible—everyone is scared to death of Miller and his gang. And everyone Kane approaches has a reason for not backing him up.  

Even Amy—a fervent believe in non-violence—threatens to leave him if he stands up to Miller. She will be on the noon train leaving town—with or without him.  

When the clock strikes noon, the train arrives, and Kane—alone—faces his enemies. He shoots and kills two of them.  

Then, as he’s pinned down by the third, he gets some unexpected help—from his wife: Amy shoots the would-be killer in the back—only to be taken hostage by Miller himself.  

Miller tells Kane to leave his concealed position or he’ll kill Amy. Kane steps into the open—and Amy claws at Miller’s face, buying Kane the time he needs to shoot Miller down.  

It’s over.  

At that point, the townspeople rush to embrace Kane and congratulate him. But he’s now seen them for the cowards they are and holds them in total contempt. 

Saying nothing, he drops the marshal’s star into the dirt. He and Amy then get into a buggy and leave town.  

Fred Zinnemann, the film’s director, intended the movie as an attack on those frightened into silence by Joseph McCarthy, the infamous Red-baiting Senator from Wisconsin.

Gary Cooper won a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance.

Today’s Republicans would do well to find the same courage as Will Kane—and choose love of country over love of self.  

Human nature being what it is, that is highly unlikely to happen.

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