bureaucracybusters

ARROGANCE AS OUTREACH

In Bureaucracy, History, Politics, Social commentary on December 19, 2017 at 2:34 pm

In July, 2016, an Associated Press/GfK poll found that half of Americans saw then-Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump as “racist”—and only 7% of blacks viewed him favorably.

Among the reasons for this:

  • His enthusiastic support by racist white supremacist organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party.
  • His “birther” attacks on President Barack Obama as a non-citizen from Kenya—and thus ineligible to hold the Presidency.
  • His attacks on the Black Lives Matter movement and calling on his supporters at rallies to rough up minority protesters.

To counter this, Trump appointed as his Director of African-American Outreach a woman with absolutely no credible ties to the black community: Omarosa Manigault.

He did so just hours before the opening of the first night of the Republican National Convention. 

Related image

Donald Trump

Manigault is best known as the villain of Trump’s reality-TV show, “The Apprentice”—where she was fired on three different seasons. Her credentials include a Ph.D. in communications, a preacher’s license, and topping TV Guide’s list of greatest reality TV villains in 2008.

During the Clinton administration she held four jobs in two years, and was thoroughly disliked in all of them.

“She was asked to leave [her last job] as quickly as possible, she was so disruptive,” said Cheryl Shavers, the former Under Secretary for Technology at the Commerce Department. “One woman wanted to slug her.”

In February, 2016, she appeared on a segment on Maria Bartiromo’s Fox Business show. Fox panelist Tamera Holder said that she would like Trump more if he expressed support for Black Lives Matter or put forward a plan to improve inner cities.

Manigault argued that the topic of the discussion should be limited to Trump’s criticism of the Iraq war. In doing so, she mispronounced Holder’s first name.

Then occurred this exchange:

Holder: “It’s Tamara.”

Manigault: “It’s the same difference, boo. You want to come on with big boobs, then you deal with the pronunciation of your name.”

“Wait a second,” Bartiromo interrupted. “Why are you bringing up Tamara’s boobs?”

Manigault: “Because she started going back talking about, ‘Oh, you were a Democrat and you supported Hillary Clinton.’ If you want to get personal, we can get personal.”

Holder: “Wait, how does who you support have to do with the size of my boobs? Considering that this is how I was born. I mean, I’m sorry.”

Manigault: “I’m sorry, I should have called you a boob. Can we talk about Donald Trump?”

Manigault wasn’t bothered that blacks regarded Trump so poorly in polls: “My reality is that I’m surrounded by people who want to see Donald Trump as the next president of the United States who are African-American.”

And, in September, 2016, she famously predicted: “Every critic, every detractor will have to bow down to President Trump. It’s everyone who’s ever doubted Donald, who ever disagreed, who ever challenged him. It is the ultimate revenge to become the most powerful man in the universe.”

Related image

Omarosa Manigault

When Trump moved into the White House on January 20, 2017, Manigault moved in with him as his director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison.

In June, she invited the Congressional Black Caucus (CBS) to visit the White House.  And she signed the invitation: “The Honorable Omarosa Manigault.”  This is not a title given to political aides. And it’s not used by those referring to themselves.

The arrogance offended some members of the CBS, which declined the invitation.

In August, Manigault appeared at the National Association of Black Journalists convention in New Orleans. She was a panelist on a discussion about losing loved ones to violence.  When the moderator, Ed Gordon, asked her about Trump’s policies and not her personal history with losing family members through violence, Manigault got into a shouting match with him.

On December 13, she was told that she would be leaving the White House on January 20, 2018–one year from the day she had arrived there. She reportedly asked Ivanka Trump to intervene on her behalf, but the request was denied.

Deciding to go right to the top, she headed for the Trump’s private quarters. There she tripped an alarm—which brought guards and White House Chief of Staff John Kelly to the scene.

An enraged Kelly ordered her ejected from the White House.

Multiple sources report that she had to be physically restrained and escorted—cursing and screaming—from the Executive Mansion.

Early reports said the Secret Service did the escorting, but the agency denied this: “Our only involvement in this matter was to deactivate the individual’s pass which grants access to the complex.”

Next day—December 14—Manigault appeared on “Good Morning America.” The woman who had been Trump’s ambassador to blacks now sang a different tune: “There were a lot of things that I observed during the last year that I was very unhappy with, that I was very uncomfortable with.

“I have seen things that made me uncomfortable, that have upset me, that have affected me deeply and emotionally, that has affected my community and my people. And when I can tell my story, it is a profound story that I know the world will want to hear.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: