bureaucracybusters

BULLIES AND COWARDS: PART ONE (OF TWO)

In History, Politics, Social commentary on November 29, 2017 at 12:36 pm

A major reason for Donald Trump’s appeal during the 2016 Presidential campaign was: “He’s not like other politicians.”

And he wasn’t.

The vast majority of politicians adhere to an unwritten rule: Even when you criticize another politician, you do so in a reasonably dignified manner.

Trump threw that rule—along with many others—out the window.  In its place, he gave his opponents—Republican and Democrat—a series of disparaging nicknames.

And, as President, he has continued to do so.

His main sources of public defamation have been Twitter and the speeches he makes.  Among the insulting nicknames have included:

  • “Jeff Flakey” – Jeff Flake, Arizona United States Senator.
  • “Crazy Megyn” – Megyn Kelly, Fox News’ then-anchor, perhaps the only member of this Right-wing propaganda outlet that Trump disliked.
  • “Liddle Bob Corker” – Bob Corker, United States Senator from Tennessee
  • “Psycho Joe” and “Dumb as a Rock Mika” – Joe Scarborough and Mika  Brzezinski, hosts of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”
  • “Lyin’ Ted” – Texas United States Senator Eduardo “Ted” Cruz.
  • “Crazy Bernie” – Vermont United States Senator Bernie Sanders.
  • “Low Energy Jeb” – Jeb Bush, the former governor of Florida.
  • “Crooked Hillary” – Hillary Clinton, former First Lady, New York United States Senator and Secretary of State.
  • “Little Marco” – Florida United States Senator Marco Rubio.
  • “Rocket Man” – North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un (because of his series of missile launches)
  • “Al Frankenstein” – Al Franken, United States Senator from Minnesota.
  • “Pocahontas” – Elizabeth Warren, United States Senator from Massachusetts.

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks appear every Friday on the PBS Newshour to review the week’s major political events.

On May 27, 2016, Shields—a liberal, and Brooks, a conservative—reached some disturbingly similar conclusions about the character of Republican Presidential front-runner Donald Trump.

Related image

David Brooks and Mark Shields

MARK SHIELDS: “Donald Trump gratuitously slandered Ted Cruz’s wife. He libeled Ted Cruz’s father for being potentially part of Lee Harvey Oswald’s assassination of the president of the United States, suggesting that he was somehow a fellow traveler in that.

“This is a libel. You don’t get over it….

“…I think this man may be addicted to the roar of the grease paint and the sound of the crowd, or however it goes, smell of the crowd.”

Donald Trump

DAVID BROOKS: “Trump, for all his moral flaws, is a marketing genius. And you look at what he does. He just picks a word and he attaches it to a person. Little Marco [Rubio], Lyin’ Ted [Cruz], Crooked Hillary [Clinton].

“And that’s a word.  And that’s how marketing works. It’s a simple, blunt message, but it gets under.

“It sticks, and it diminishes. And so it has been super effective for him, because he knows how to do that.  And she [Hillary Clinton] just comes with, ‘Oh, he’s divisive.’

“These are words that are not exciting people. And her campaign style has gotten, if anything…a little more stagnant and more flat.”

Only one opponent—who was not a Presidential candidate—managed to stand up to Trump: Massachusetts U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren.  Whenever Trump attacks her, Warren strikes back—sometimes even more harshly.

As Mark Shields noted:

“Elizabeth Warren gets under Donald Trump’s skin.  And I think she’s been the most effective adversary. I think she’s done more to unite the Democratic party than either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders.”

From June 15, 2015, when he launched his Presidential campaign, until October 24, 2016, Trump used Twitter to fire almost 4,000 angry, insulting tweets at 281 people and institutions that had somehow offended him.

Warren has dared to do what no other Democrat—or Republican—has: Attack Trump head-on, with the kind of blunt, insulting language he has lavished on his opponents.

Among the jabs she has thrown at him on Twitter:

  • “But here’s the thing. You can beat a bully—not by tucking tail and running, but by holding your ground.”
  • “You care so much about struggling American workers, @realDonaldTrump, that you want to abolish the federal minimum wage?”
  • @realDonaldTrump: Your policies are dangerous. Your words are reckless. Your record is embarrassing. And your free ride is over.”

Nor is Twitter her only weapon.

On March 31, Warren appeared on The Late Show, with Stephen Colbert. Her take on the egotistical billionaire:

“Donald Trump is looking out for exactly one guy, and that guy’s name is Donald Trump. He smells that there’s change in the air and what he wants to do is make sure that that change works really, really well for Donald Trump.

“The truth is, he inherited a fortune from his father, he kept it going by cheating and defrauding people, and then he takes his creditors through Chapter 11.”

When Colbert said that Trump had never broken the law, Warren replied that he had never broken the law “and been caught.”

For David Brooks, Warren’s tactics prove a depressing, lose/lose situation:

“And so the tactics…is either you do what Elizabeth Warren has done, like full-bore negativity, that kind of [get] under the skin, or try to ridicule him and use humor. Humor is not Hillary Clinton’s strongest point.”

As a whole, Democrats have shown themselves indifferent to or ignorant of the power of effective language.

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